PLACE: Working with Youth Changemakers

Impact Entrepreneurs Director talks about her social enterprise, Speak Shop, to the students of PLACE.

Impact Entrepreneurs Director Cindy Cooper talks about her social enterprise, Speak Shop, to the students of PLACE.

“Follow your curiosity.” — Qiddist Hammerly

At PSU’s Impact Entrepreneurs, we’ve learned that there’s no best age for someone to become a changemaker. From early childhood to encore careers, changemaking and social entrepreneurship can be taught—and realized—at any age. As we expand our university and professional programs to younger members of the community, partnering with Catlin Gabel’s remarkable PLACE program was a natural fitThis year, we worked with PLACE to provide a series of workshops on developing key skills and mindsets for changemaking, including resilience, empathy, optimism, and curiosity.

These skills, linked to successful social entrepreneurs, are also highly desired by employers around the world. We worked with PLACE students using tools including the Business Model You framework and activities from the Transformative Action Curriculum. The students were also treated to a panel of youth changemakers, including the inspiring founders of menstrual hygiene nonprofit Camions of Care, rural clinic Orchid Health, youth prison book provider Liberation Library, and low-cost prosthetic device firm GO Prosthetics.

Students were asked to explore and outline their goals in life. By tying those to the social and environmental problems they care about, as well as the skills they need to create positive change, we hoped guide them to a better understanding of their purpose and how to follow that passion. The results were truly inspiring, from plans to run a community education session on sex trafficking at the new PLACE Center, to help immigrants pass the citizenship test, or simply to explore a newfound passion for changemaking.

When Qiddist Hammerly, a Catlin Gabel alumna and university student involved in Liberation Library, was asked where to start in making positive change, she suggested that students simply “follow their curiosity.” We’ve done the same as we work to teach social entrepreneurship to a younger audience than that of our typical adult workshops and university courses. Along the way, we’ve learned what to adapt (shorter lectures!), but more importantly, we’ve learned how much of what we teach is applicable for changemakers of any age.

Want to follow your curiosity? Learn how to run a program like PLACE using their free curriculum guide, or contact us to discuss how we can provide changemaking workshops for your organization.

July 30, 2015 at 12:38 pm Leave a comment

Our Award-Winning Social Entrepreneurship and Sustainability Cases

For several years, Portland State University’s (PSU) School of Business Administration (SBA) has managed a case writing program for students, faculty, and staff to create original business cases showcasing sustainable businesses or social enterprises from the Portland area. The cases have been used in courses at PSU and other universities, provided valuable learning opportunities in academic writing, and given innovative local organizations international exposure.

The program has enjoyed global recognition: previous PSU SBA cases, all available for free online, include two winners and three finalists of the prestigious oikos Case Writing Competition.

We are delighted to share that Impact Entrepreneurs was involved in developing two award-winning cases in 2015, both planned and co-authored by Impact Entrepreneurs Program Manager Jacen Greene.

Grameen Intel Social Business, written by Jacen Greene, Impact Entrepreneurs Director Cindy Cooper, and PSU Professor Ted Khoury, won 2nd Place in the Next Billion Case Writing Competition. Based on content created for PSU’s Business of Social Innovation Certificate, the case details a unique joint venture between Grameen Trust and Intel Corporation to deliver technology solutions that enable some of the world’s lowest-income people to earn more money, increase early childhood education, and improve maternal health. The prize money was donated to PSU to be used by students for opportunities to learn about social enterprise and sustainability. The case can be purchased from the GlobalLens archive.

Hopworks Urban Brewery, written by PSU Professor Madeleine Pullman, Jacen Greene, PSU employee Xan Pedisich, and PSU MBA students Devin Liebmann and Nga Ho, won 1st Prize in the oikos Case Writing Competition. Building on material from PSU’s Business of Craft Brewing Certificate, the case details the sustainability initiatives of Portland, Oregon brewpub Hopworks, one of the greenest breweries in the nation. The prize money was split between the student and staff co-authors. The case is available for free at the oikos Case Collection.

If you’d like to see a review copy of either case and teaching note, or if you’re interested in having your own organization featured in a future case, please email Jacen Greene: jacen (at) pdx.edu

July 7, 2015 at 3:39 pm Leave a comment

Partnering with Youth in 2015

By Cindy Cooper, Co-founder & Director, PSU’s Impact Entrepreneurs

 

One of my favorite quotes from our 2013 Elevating Impact Summit was when Eric Dawson, Co-founder & President of Peace First, said, “Children aren’t the future. Children are the present.”

I’ve since thought a lot about the opportunity Eric laid out before us.

An Ashoka U Changemaker Campus, Portland State University is considered one of the world’s leading universities for making changemakers and inspiring action for a better world. I wondered how Impact Entrepreneurs, as a program in a university, could situate youth in our efforts to inspire, incubate and accelerate impact through the promise of business.

Then, I met George Zaninovich who knows a lot about tapping into the power of youth. George created PLACE: Planning and Leadership Across City Environments. A program of Portland’s Catlin Gabel school, PLACE provides high school students and recent graduates from any regional school with an opportunity to lead civic and urban planning projects that create positive change in Portland. For example, designing solutions to food insecurity in outer SE Portland in partnership with Zenger Farm, and developing transportation solutions and enhancing the safety on the Powell corridor with the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability.

In its seventh year, PLACE has engaged thousands of Portlanders in its projects and worked with hundreds of students from 18 high schools. PLACE has even made its program open source by creating a comprehensive curriculum guide that has been downloaded in more than 50 cities across the world.

Talking with George, we found shared learning goals and beliefs with one big difference: Where PLACE’s experiential projects are defined by the needs of community leaders and urban environments, Impact Entrepreneurs roots its hands-on learning in identifying and pursuing personal purpose for social change. This is the type of complementarity that collective impact is made from!

The decision to work together was a no-brainer, and over many months we co-created an approach that integrates Impact Entrepreneurs’ into PLACE’s 2015 summer program. The collaboration means that 24 PLACE students will explore personal changemaking through the lens of social innovation. They will meet inspiring innovators, examine best practices, and engage in activities to develop their own purpose and pathways toward making a lasting difference.

PLACE’s 2015 program starts July 6th. We’ll bring you updates as we go. Let the changemaking begin!

JacenG_GeorgeZ_PLACE

 Jacen Greene, Impact Entrepreneurs, & George Zaninovich, PLACE

 

 

June 9, 2015 at 4:53 pm Leave a comment

Three Key Lessons for Changemakers Everywhere

svpp_changemakers_night_051915-70This post was contributed by Nadya Okamoto, Executive Director of Camions of Care, and Youth Director of Social Venture Partners Youth.


I’m Nadya Okamoto, a 17-year-old in Portland, OR determined to make a difference, and founder and executive director of Camions of Care (COC). COC is a nonprofit organization based here in Portland that strives to address the natural needs of homeless women primarily through the distribution of feminine hygiene product care packages. In the last six months, we have distributed over 1,500 care packages to women in Portland, Connecticut, South Dakota, Salt Lake City, and Guatemala, and we are hoping to expand that network of outreach as we gain more support.

Last month was the 2015 Changemakers Night hosted in partnership by Social Venture Partners and Impact Entrepreneurs at Portland State University. I had the unbelievable honor of playing a role in the event as the emcee, and was given the opportunity to tell my story as a young and aspiring changemaker, as well as to introduce three inspiring new role models of mine. Throughout the event, through listening to the three keynote speakers talk, and hearing about the work of many of the attendees, I learned three unforgettable lessons that are key to being a changemaker:

svpp_changemakers_night_051915-831) Build your work around your purpose: The people at Changemakers Night were not just savvy in their fields of work, but were passionate about their personal missions. Being a changemaker takes a lot of work and a lot of hours advocating, connecting, and implementing programs, and one cannot accomplish that to their greatest extent without putting relentless energy toward reaching their goal. Thus, identifying that purpose is key to ensuring that you have the determination and authenticity to make your mark. I believe that this concept was embodied by one of the featured speakers, Jeremy Hockenstein, who weaved together his passion for business, international nonprofit work, and technology to create Digital Divide Data. Digital Divide Data is pioneering an “impact sourcing” model to provide education, professional development, and technology-related jobs for young people in underserved communities around the world.

svpp_changemakers_night_051915-682) Embrace what sets you apart: Everyone brings a unique perspective composed of our backgrounds, experiences, skills, and passions. As we embrace our differences, we bring new and important insights to address complex and entrenched social problems. For me, an experience that may be classified as “different,” but also gives me my driving force to lead Camions of Care, is my family’s own experience with not being able to live in our apartment and having to transition into living under the legal label of “homelessness” for a period of time. I was inspired at Changemakers Night by Jane Stevens, a journalist and researcher who leveraged her unique set of skills and opportunities to begin shifting social perspectives and address the effects of toxic stress and Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACES) with her organizations Aces Connection and Aces Too High.

svpp_changemakers_night_051915-713) Consider connections: It was at Changemakers Night that I reached a deeper understanding on the importance of connections. My epiphany on this was spurred by Kazi Huque’s speech. As the CEO of Grameen Intel Social Business, he leads a partnership between Grameen Bank and Intel Corporation spreading IT services to a whole new market on a global scale. As a leader, empowering others is central to growing a movement, and to gain inspiration from others is forever a possibility. Connections not only enable your work to spread beyond your own fingertips, but they also help generate a cohesive community that strives for a happier world.

The 2015 Changemakers Night was an unforgettable experience. It brought inspiration and introductions to new perspectives that will undoubtedly help each of us as we embark on our own paths to social impact.

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See more photos from Changemakers Night here

June 9, 2015 at 9:00 am Leave a comment

PDX Social Innovation Community Convenes May 19

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Behind every social innovation there’s a story. Sometimes they reveal a clear and unwavering path and others talk about a winding, shifting, evolving idea. On May 19, Impact Entrepreneurs and Social Venture Partners bring these these stories to the stage to inspire and encourage everyone to find pathways to creating positive social and environmental impact. We invite you to join us for Changemakers Night.

Jeremy_squareJeremy Hockenstein was on a direct professional trajectory, checking all the boxes from Harvard to McKinsey and Co. as a management consultant when, on vacation in Cambodia, he was struck by the gap between what he saw as young people’s tech skills and their employment prospects. Now he leads an international enterprise focused on training, employing, and supporting the education of thousands of young people in Cambodia and Laos.

jane_stevens_175Dr. Jane Stevens had been a newspaper and magazine journalist, focusing on health, science and technology for 30 years when she began digging into a massive body of evidence about the consequences of Adverse Childhood Experiences. She now leads two news-based organizations focused on changing systems to prevent Adverse Childhood Experiences,  and to stop traumatizing already traumatized people.

KKazi sqazi Huque was managing and negotiating venture capital deals as a finance controller with Intel Corporation and undertaking a project to determine consumption of computing power around the world. Realizing that only 20% of the global population was being reached by computing technology, he saw an opportunity. Now Huque leads Grameen-Intel, developing a growing  portfolio of software products for healthcare and agriculture, targeting micro-entrepreneurs who serve their local communities in emerging nations.

Impact Entrepreneurs and Social Venture Partners invite you to explore social innovation through the lens of these three speakers. Through their stories, a set of musical performances, and the vibrance that just happens when Portland’s social change community gets together, we hope you will be inspired to discover paths to social impact.

The event will take place in the recently renovated Revolution Hall in the historic Washington High School in SE Portland on the evening of May 19. Attendees will explore the space and meet one another over light food, local microbrews and Oregon wine from 5 – 6 p.m., then will gather in the auditorium for a set of performances, presentations, and discussions. The program will close at 7:30.


Social Venture Partners and PSU Impact Entrepreneurs present:
Changemakers Night

Speakers:
Kazi Huque – CEO, Grameen Intel Social Business Ltd
Jeremy Hockenstein – Co-Founder and CEO, Digital Divide Data
Jane Stevens – Founder of ACES Connection & ACEStoohigh.com

Tuesday, May 19
Reception 5-6pm, Interactive presentations and discussion 6-7:30pm
Revolution Hall, Washington High School, 1300 SE Stark, Portland
Tickets: $50 for general admission, $15 for students
Register here: http://bit.ly/1xkn7cs

Contact impactentrepreneurs@pdx.edu with questions


Sponsorbanner

April 15, 2015 at 8:18 am Leave a comment

One Word Takeaways from the 2015 Ashoka U Exchange

In 2012, PSU was selected as an Ashoka U Changemaker Campus, a designation honoring our university’s excellence in social innovation education and commitment to making higher education a world-changing experience.

Ashoka U is a highly respected international non-profit organization which believes that: “In a world that is changing faster and faster, students need interdisciplinary, entrepreneurial, and solutions-oriented skills to succeed. Ashoka believes the way colleges and universities can stay relevant is to embed Changemaker skills such as empathy, teamwork, leadership and changemaking into their culture and across their curriculum.” As we recently reported, research shows that employers agree.

Our world in the 21st century requires us, as changemakers, to improve lives and strengthen our planet in a period where the pace of change itself has changed. We can’t keep up – let alone lead – by simply learning, doing, and repeating. In the words of Ashoka’s founder, Bill Drayton, “It’s the change game, not the repetition game. If you don’t understand that, you can’t lead.”

Last week, the three authors of this post were among the 700 attendees at Ashoka U’s annual convening, the Exchange. We celebrated the now 30 Changemaker Campuses, including public universities and private colleges all over the world who are building a global “Everyone a Changemaker” movement.

Starting with one word to express our experiences, these are our reflections.

Cindy Cooper, Director, Impact Entrepreneurs, School of Business Administration*

“Reinforcing”

The Exchange was reinforcing. It was reinforcing to coalesce with a committed group of dedicated educators and innovators who are in solidarity about the promise of higher education to build changemakers for a better world.

PSU’s mantra is “Let Knowledge Serve the City.” Our expression of this ethos at PSU’s Impact Entrepreneurs is to contribute to creating the conditions that enable people to make choices for good.

These lofty ideals fuel us as inspiring visions of the future should. But the climb is real work, and the air can get thin. We face challenges every day to grow and improve our programs, deliver on goals and measure our impact. We constantly ask ourselves: How do we support more staff, faculty and students in being changemakers? How do we generate more strategic and effective collaborations across campus and with a global community of partners? How do we equip more impact-driven innovators with the resources they need to succeed? How do we know we are generating more happiness and less suffering?

Being among hundreds of individuals candidly sharing their efforts to get the values and skills of changemaking to reach as many people as possible helps us develop better approaches and validates our progress so far. It says we are on the right track, but don’t stop, keep going, aim higher. Reinforcement makes us stronger, more creative and more resilient. It is the meditative oxygen we need to reach our promises to ourselves and each other.

The 2015 Ashoka U Exchange and the chance to connect with a vast network of inspiring leaders in higher education provided a deep breath of reinforcement: a solid foundation of best practices and the esprit de corps to press on.

Abby Chroman, Project Manager, Impact Entrepreneurs, School of Business Administration

“Intersections”

Advancing social innovation in higher ed. doesn’t mean leaving behind expertise in policy, or engineering, design, medicine, journalism, or law. It means creating environments where  disciplines are integrally connected for real world application. The 2015 Ashoka U Exchange demonstrated intersections among what I see as some of the most important skills, schools, movements, and ideas in the world today.

Packed into a classroom in the classic-looking University Of Maryland campus on the last day of the Exchange, I listened in on a discussion about public policy and social entrepreneurship, particularly in the context of higher education. The panelists were brilliant. They explored the historic context for the existing relationship between academia, social innovation, and public policy, and with active engagement from the audience, closed with practical ways to grow the impact of that intersection.

In another session authors and NYT columnists David Bornstein and Tina Rosenberg along with NYU professor Robert Lyon and instructor Sri Naomi Bishop facilitated a conversation about the power of solutions narratives both as journalistic practice, and as content for curriculum. The discussion brought forth everything from existing structures for publication in news and journals to ways instructors can find relevant tailored materials for lessons, and the tension and importance of in-depth reporting in a fast changing world.

As a Millennial working in social entrepreneurship and higher ed., I’m sensitive to the question about what role higher ed. has if we can’t predict the future. From where I stood in snowy Washington, DC last week, something came into focus for me. The particular role of higher ed. might be changing but it’s not becoming less important. Colleges and universities have the ability to strengthen and empower individuals in deep and complex disciplines to shift and tip systems that span sectors, borders, and schools of thought. What other institution can do that? The more we enforce the intersections of disciplines for real world solutions, the more I want to be a part of this.

Angela Merrill, Changemaker Campus Liaison, Impact Entrepreneurs, School of Business Administration & Institute for Sustainable Solutions*

“Canvas”

Much how the fibers of an artist’s canvas provide a surface from which to paint, the interwoven and reinforced fibers of the community at The Ashoka U Exchange provide students a surface from which to create a masterpiece of the world.

A favorite pastime of mine has always been to draw unguided, yet inspired, doodles on the pages of my sketchbooks. Every line, dot and abstract figure looks different to create a whole and impacting image. The conference format too creates an environment to explore various topics to compose a “big picture.” There were personal development sessions and workshops on systems thinking or “the science of change,” insights on international development as well as the role of social entrepreneurship in social justice.

However, what sparkled were connections with student leaders from various universities. To me, it created a diverse gallery of the initiatives that are thriving with the support of the Ashoka U canvas. A friend from Brown spoke of “Pop-Up Classes” in changemaking, while students from the University of San Diego spoke of their sunny, music-filled social impact career fair while Fordham detailed a program that equips students with consulting skills to gain credit and work experience.

We, as Portlanders, are organically drawn to lead social change, and the canvas surface has been prepped. My question for the students, faculty and staff at Portland State is this:

How do we want our changemaker masterpiece to look?

*A special thank you to reTHINK: PSU and the Institute for Sustainable Solutions for generously supporting our participation in the Ashoka U Exchange.

March 9, 2015 at 9:22 am Leave a comment

Meet Our 2015 Social Innovation Incubator Members!

The Impact Entrepreneurs Social Innovation Incubator has emerged from hiatus! After taking a year off while we created our online certificate in the Business of Social Innovation, we are thrilled to be back.

We are excited to be working closely over the next year with four amazing new members. Check them out:

 

ConstructFoundationLogo136x46Construct Foundation is building a portfolio of partners and mutually reinforcing education initiatives to identify and support new models for teaching and learning, prioritizing K-12 students in Portland Metro’s underserved communities.

 

GGY_Logo_Red_White_400Gender Gap Year is closing the gaps in women’s representation, leadership, power and pay through an innovative gap year program in Portland Oregon.  Through badging, boldness, action, and self exploration, the year long program empowers women between 18 and 22 to live authentic, connected, and strategic lives of equity.

LanyiFan_0Lanyi Fan incubates locally-generated solutions and facilitates international relationships to address the high unemployment and environmental problems encroaching on existing livelihoods in West Africa.

 

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The Pathways to Prosperity Initiative, an intrapreneurial program of nonprofit Self Enhancement Inc. (SEI), provides at-risk urban youth and their families in the Portland area “with the knowledge, skills and support needed to leverage economic opportunities and increase financial capability.”

 

 

Meet past members, find out more about the Social Innovation Incubator, and stay tuned to this blog for upcoming interviews with the inspiring founders from the 2015 class!

March 2, 2015 at 12:34 pm Leave a comment

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